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Stroke survivors hail importance of art for recovery at fundraising festival in Sudbury




Stroke survivors have spoken of the value of art in aiding their physical and mental recovery, as the fruits of their labour were revealed at a fundraising exhibition throughout this week.

St Peter’s in Sudbury is currently hosting the BrushStroke Festival of Art, with proceeds going towards the therapy services and activity groups run by Success After Stroke.

The event is selling paintings and pottery created during the Great Cornard-based charity’s weekly art sessions, which aim to help people who have experienced a stroke to build up their confidence, motor skills and co-ordination.

The BrushStroke Festival of Art at St Peter's in Sudbury is raising money for Success After Stroke. Pictured from left: art teacher Marnie Bragg; artists and stroke survivors Judy Davey, Fiona Yerofeyev and Sue Hume; and exhibition secretary Bridget Allen. Photo by Thomas Malina. (30930499)
The BrushStroke Festival of Art at St Peter's in Sudbury is raising money for Success After Stroke. Pictured from left: art teacher Marnie Bragg; artists and stroke survivors Judy Davey, Fiona Yerofeyev and Sue Hume; and exhibition secretary Bridget Allen. Photo by Thomas Malina. (30930499)

Judy Davey, who has attended the Success After Stroke art classes for around 18 months, said: “It’s great fun. I think it also helps with your mental state as well, because it helps you think, so you don’t focus on your pains or anything else.

“None of us really painted before this. It’s a confidence thing, because everybody there is like-minded.”

Fiona Yerofeyev added: “It’s the quickest two hours – the classes just fly by.

“Everybody understands and supports each other. I still have problems writing with a pen, but I can paint. It does aid your recovery.”

The exhibition, which also features works from a number of guest artists. has also received praise from Sudbury mayor Robert Spivey, who is backing Success After Stroke as one of the chosen charities for his mayoral year.

Mr Spivey – who himself recovered from a mild stroke that he suffered in 2012 – told the Free Press: “I’ve got personal experience, which is why I was so keen to support the charity.

“When people come around and see the art here, I think they are quite surprised by the work, which is a fantastic thing. It shows that a stroke isn’t the end of the road – it’s the start of something new.”

The show continues through to Saturday, and is open each day from 10am to 4pm.

To find out more about Success After Stroke, go online to www.successafterstroke.org.uk.


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