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Parents of epileptic girl from Clare call for long-term solution for access to medicinal cannabis


By Priya Kingsley-Adam


The parents of a young girl with severe epilepsy, whose medication was seized at an airport, have called for a long-term solution over an on-going battle surrounding medicinal cannabis.

Anthony Clarry was forced to hand over a supply of cannabis oil at Stansted Airport, which is used to treat his five-year old daughter Indie-Rose.

The medication has now been returned to the family from Clare, who fear that their daughter’s health could be put at further risk if access to medicinal cannabis fails to improve.

Tannine Montgomery with Indie-Rose by the beacon at Clare Castle Country Park (14906750)
Tannine Montgomery with Indie-Rose by the beacon at Clare Castle Country Park (14906750)

“There needs to be a resolution,” said Indie’s mother, Tannine Montgomery, of Maxim Lane. “I’m happy that she has her medication, but this shouldn’t have happened.”

After being alerted to the incident, South Suffolk MP James Cartlidge contacted government officials and requested that the medication be returned to the family.

While expressing his delight at the recent outcome, Mr Cartlidge, has reiterated the importance of resolving the frequent obstacles which continue to surround access to the drug.

Clare, Suffolk, CO10 8FH.A series of fundraisers are being held in Clare to raise money for local girl Indie-Rose Clarry, who has Dravet Syndrome, a rare genetic condition which causes epileptic seizures. Her parents, Tannine and Anthony, are hoping to take her to Holland, where she can be treated with cannabis oil, which has been found to be an effective treatment for epilepsy also pictured young Greyson..Picture by Mark Westley. (14906652)
Clare, Suffolk, CO10 8FH.A series of fundraisers are being held in Clare to raise money for local girl Indie-Rose Clarry, who has Dravet Syndrome, a rare genetic condition which causes epileptic seizures. Her parents, Tannine and Anthony, are hoping to take her to Holland, where she can be treated with cannabis oil, which has been found to be an effective treatment for epilepsy also pictured young Greyson..Picture by Mark Westley. (14906652)

“I am very relieved to hear that Border Force has now released Indie-Rose’s medication back to her parents,” he said.

“I am grateful for the speed with which this decision was taken following my conversations with the Police Minister, Kit Malthouse MP.

“What this has clearly demonstrated is that this situation is not sustainable and that a long-term solution must be found.”



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