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Mother of Nayland girl who died from brain tumour hopes nomination for fundraising award will raise awareness of disease




The mother of a young girl from Nayland, who died from a brain tumour, hopes her nomination for a prestigious award will help to raise further awareness of the aggressive disease.

Lizzie Bramall, of Bear Street, was diagnosed with diffuse midline glioma – a rare and inoperable brain tumour.

After suffering from both double vision and a loss of balance, the nine-year-old underwent radiotherapy and drug treatment, before losing her battle with the disease in 2018.

Sally and Mark Bramall with daughter, Lizzie, who died from a brain tumour aged nine. Mrs Bramall has been nominated for an award in recognition of her fundraising efforts. (34891914)
Sally and Mark Bramall with daughter, Lizzie, who died from a brain tumour aged nine. Mrs Bramall has been nominated for an award in recognition of her fundraising efforts. (34891914)

Following her diagnosis, Lizzie’s Fund was set up to support vital research into brain tumours among young children.

Lizzie’s mother, Sally, who has been instrumental in helping to raise almost £300,000 for The Brain Tumour Charity, is among the nominees short-listed at this year’s National Fundraising Awards.

Hosted by the Institute of Fundraising (IoF), the annual event recognises the dedication of individuals who have worked tirelessly to support worthy causes.

Reflecting on the achievement, Mrs Bramall said: “The nomination honours the passion expressed by hundreds of people to make a difference for critical research into childhood brain cancer.

“Lizzie was only nine when she was diagnosed, but she was incredibly motivated to do something to raise money for the research trial she was on.

“She started by organising a big bake sale at her school and then published her own recipe book – this positive drive from her really rubbed off on all her friends and family.”

Highlighting the importance of developing further knowledge into the disease to improve patients’ survival rate, Mrs Bramall said: “Public awareness of investing in research feels heightened by the Covid-19 crisis, so more accessible medical data can only help scientists find the magic key so desperately needed to find a cure for something like DIPG, where standard palliative treatment has remained fundamentally the same for over half a century.”

Staff and pupils at Littlegarth School in Nayland have hosted a series of fundraising events, while a cookery room in Lizzie’s memory was opened at the school last year.

Mrs Bramall added: “Brain tumours are the biggest cancer killer of young people.

“This award nomination inspires me to keep driving towards changing this devastating statistic and ensuring the loss of a child doesn’t happen to other families.”


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