Green Party warns overdevelopment risks turning Sudbury into ‘another clone suburb’

Works are taking place to renovate the giant clocks at the top of St Peter's Church in Sudbury.

Pictured: Market Hill


PICTURE: Mecha Morton
Works are taking place to renovate the giant clocks at the top of St Peter's Church in Sudbury. Pictured: Market Hill PICTURE: Mecha Morton

A county councillor has warned that Sudbury must beware of growing for the sake of growth, or risk losing its character and becoming another clone suburb.

Babergh Green Party has set out its alternative vision for the district, calling for measures to improve quality of life and to combat climate change.

The move is in response to Babergh and Mid Suffolk district councils’ joint local plan, for which a public consultation concluded on Friday.

The two councils will now review the feedback, so it can form a roadmap to guide development in the districts until 2036.

The councils say the goal is to determine its approach to where new homes and business developments will go, and how it will enhance the environment and deliver infrastructure in the area.

But the Green Party argues the “incessant demand” to build more roads and housing would destroy the natural environment and rural charm in the two districts, reiterating its opposition to the proposed bypass for Sudbury.

Suffolk county councillor and Green Party member Robert Lindsay, told the Free Press: “I think it’s important to have a thriving economy for our towns like Sudbury, but what we should be doing is supporting and nurturing the town centre.

“If you start building out the town, you destroy the delicate economy of Sudbury. Quite apart from all the new traffic, you risk hollowing out the town.

“I am not the only one who thinks these plans are far too aggressive. I think we have shown that there are large numbers of people who don’t buy into the vision of ever more road building and out-of-town housing and business development.”

The Greens suggest that investment should go into existing roads rather than new ones, and into greater public transport, cycling and walking routes.

It argues that by pushing for development within walking or cycling distance of local facilities and public transport hubs, and by seeking developer contributions towards these hubs, it would reduce car dependency and congestion, cut carbon emissions and improve the sense of community and town wellbeing.