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Dietitian in Great Cornard delighted after becoming first in profession in east of England to secure top qualification to help improve patient care




A dietitian from Great Cornard has voiced her pride after being recognised as the first in the region to secure a highly sought-after qualification to help her improve patient care, as hospitals grapple with coronavirus.

Sara Rollin received her non-medical independent and supplementary prescribing qualification from the University of Suffolk, becoming the only dietitian in the east of England and one of just a handful to pass the course.

The accreditation enables her to prescribe artificial nutrition and other agreed medicines without requiring a doctor to sign off on the prescription each time, supporting people with ailments affecting their digestion, including Crohn’s disease and bowel perforations.

Sara Rollin, of Great Cornard, received her non-medical independent and supplementary prescribing qualification from the University of Suffolk. Contributed picture. (37633962)
Sara Rollin, of Great Cornard, received her non-medical independent and supplementary prescribing qualification from the University of Suffolk. Contributed picture. (37633962)

The 28-year-old, who works at Ipswich Hospital, explained she had lost study days because of the pandemic, meaning she had to finish the course while working full-time as the outbreak hit, and even used a mannequin for her final exam to reduce the risk of infection.

She said she was delighted to achieve the qualification, stating it will make a huge difference in cutting out delays in patient treatment, particularly while front-line medical workers face additional pressures due to the current crisis.

“I think it’s taken a while to sink in,” Sara said. “I’ve never been the most academic person, or the one to be first or get the highest marks, so it still feels a bit surreal.

“I’m very proud of myself and I look forward to putting it into practice. It will absolutely speed up things in the current situation.

“I’m always down on the ward, and I’m seeing these patients day in, day out, so having to go and get a doctor for the prescriptions slows the process down.

“By having this qualification, it will speed up and improve patient care, and get more patients seen in a more timely manner.”

Sara, a resident of Carsons Drive, also encouraged people to try to ensure they maintain a healthy diet and good nutrition while in lockdown, emphasising the benefits this has on overall health.

“I think it’s important for people to keep on top of their nutrition all year round,” she added.

“If you keep yourself healthy, you will reduce the risk of catching something.”


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