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Headteacher calls for an end to school testing that 'adds nothing' to assessment of pupils' abilities




A headteacher from Clare has taken part in a briefing meeting with MPs at Westminster to give her views on primary school testing.

Rebecca Loader, from Clare Community Primary School, joined the briefing – organised by More Than A Score, a coalition of parents, teachers, headteachers and education experts – on Wednesday.

The organisation is calling for an end to government testing in primary schools.

Headteachers Together - Christine Inchley, left, Headteacher at Stour Valley Community School, and Rebecca Loader, right, Headteacher at Clare Community Primary School. The two schools became part of the Stour Valley Educational Trust in 2017.
Headteachers Together - Christine Inchley, left, Headteacher at Stour Valley Community School, and Rebecca Loader, right, Headteacher at Clare Community Primary School. The two schools became part of the Stour Valley Educational Trust in 2017.

Teachers from around the country met 15 MPs and representatives from the House of Lords to relay their views on the impact of government testing on pupils and what they think about it.

Ms Loader said: “Schools are crying out for money to support growing rolls, growing numbers of children with additional needs and disadvantage, and funding to be allocated more fairly throughout the country.

“Meanwhile, the Government is spending tens of thousands of pounds on new statutory tests, such as the reception baseline and Year 4 tables test, which add absolutely nothing to school leaders’ own assessment of their schools or their pupils and, in fact, take valuable time away from the business of actually teaching.”

She added: “When will they listen to the professionals?”

Jill Robinson, from More Than A Score, said: “Sats and other standardised assessments have come under scrutiny in recent years as parents, educators and experts have spoken out against the current system.

“In February, the Government announced that it will go ahead with tests in English and maths for four and five year olds when they start school.

“This will mean that, from September, primary school children will sit formal government tests in five out of seven primary school years.”

Research from More Than A Score with headteachers found that 93 per cent of headteachers believe that the Government should review the current system of standardised assessment.


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