Tribute to Daisy is beautiful and fitting, says mum

Bures Primary School, Bures,
Children have designed a mosaic for the outside of their primary school in memory of their classmate 7-year-old Daisy Brooks who died 2 years ago. It is lots of daisy designs and each child has brought in a button to put in the middle of their daisy. 
Anna Brooks with Bertie and Diane Byford and Tam Blake who designed the mosaic.
Picture Mark Westley
Bures Primary School, Bures, Children have designed a mosaic for the outside of their primary school in memory of their classmate 7-year-old Daisy Brooks who died 2 years ago. It is lots of daisy designs and each child has brought in a button to put in the middle of their daisy. Anna Brooks with Bertie and Diane Byford and Tam Blake who designed the mosaic. Picture Mark Westley
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A mother from Bures has described a school’s memorial to her daughter as ‘beautiful and fitting’.

Seven-year-old Daisy Brooks died from a brain tumour in 2014.

Bures Primary School, Bures,
Children have designed a mosaic for the outside of their primary school in memory of their classmate 7-year-old Daisy Brooks who died 2 years ago. It is lots of daisy designs and each child has brought in a button to put in the middle of their daisy. 
Anna Brooks with Bertie and Diane Byford and Tam Blake who designed the mosaic.
Picture Mark Westley

Bures Primary School, Bures, Children have designed a mosaic for the outside of their primary school in memory of their classmate 7-year-old Daisy Brooks who died 2 years ago. It is lots of daisy designs and each child has brought in a button to put in the middle of their daisy. Anna Brooks with Bertie and Diane Byford and Tam Blake who designed the mosaic. Picture Mark Westley

This week, a mosaic designed by her former teacher, Tam Blake, and artist Diane Byford was hung above a bench that Daisy used to sit at in the grounds of Bures Primary School.

Daisy’s mum, Anna, said: “We think it’s beautiful and fitting for Daisy as she spent hours making mosaics. She went through whole boxes of them.”

The design includes a field of flowers to represent Daisy and her sister Poppy’s names.

There are rainbows, which Daisy was told to send when she was feeling poorly, and butterflies as she used to dream about flying on butterflies when she was unwell.

Babergh Oddfellows has raised funds for Funding Neuro in memory of Bures schoolgirl Daisy Brooks. Pictured from left; Emma Collins from Funding Neuro, Margaret Maybury from Oddfellows and Anna Brooks mother of Daisy.

Babergh Oddfellows has raised funds for Funding Neuro in memory of Bures schoolgirl Daisy Brooks. Pictured from left; Emma Collins from Funding Neuro, Margaret Maybury from Oddfellows and Anna Brooks mother of Daisy.

The daisy centres are made from special buttons selected by her classmates, school staff and family, each representing something important to them.

These include a Bertie the bus to represent Anna and Louis Brooks’ son Bertie, who was born after Daisy’s death, and a duck as Daisy’s first words were ‘quack quack’.

The children each made a butterfly and completed a little part of the rainbow.

Since her death, Daisy’s family have raised nearly £450,000 for Funding Neuro, which funds research into neurological conditions, including DIPG brain tumours.

Upcoming fundraisers include a vine run and children’s fun run at Dedham Vale Vineyard on June 3.

For more information on all of the ‘Do it for Daisy’ events and to donate, visit the charity’s Facebook page by searching for ‘Fundraising Page for Daisy’.

l Last week, the Babergh branch of Oddfellows presented a cheque for £2,052 to Mrs Brooks for the campaign.

The money was raised from a concert held in St Peter’s in June with Sudbury Sings Choir, as well as money from members’ fundraising during the last few months.

Margaret Maybury, social secretary for the branch, said: “Our members have been on a journey of sadness, hope and compassion with the family of Daisy.

“We sincerely hope the money raised will help in the research for DIPG; and we were delighted to welcome Anna and her son Bertie to our meeting, along with Emma Collins from Funding Neuro, both of whom spoke movingly of the loss of a daughter and the research work of Professor Gill.

“There were a lot of tears and hugs after Anna spoke and hardly a dry eye in the house.”