Sudbury actor urges people to join local dramatics scene following first film appearance

Sudbury based actor Oliver Rednall has just starred in his first feature film


PICTURE: Mecha Morton
Sudbury based actor Oliver Rednall has just starred in his first feature film PICTURE: Mecha Morton

A Sudbury actor is urging people to get involved in local amateur dramatics, following his first feature film appearance just four years after his first performance at The Quay Theatre.

In 2013, lifelong Sudbury resident Oliver Rednall, a British Army reservist and Suffolk special constable, began acting on stage at the venue in Quay Lane, as a performer in the Sudbury Dramatic Society.

Sudbury based actor Oliver Rednall has just starred in his first feature film


PICTURE: Mecha Morton

Sudbury based actor Oliver Rednall has just starred in his first feature film PICTURE: Mecha Morton

Now he is set to appear as a small role in HBO’s upcoming film My Dinner with Hervé, which stars Peter Dinklage, of Game of Thrones fame, and he has signed with Identity Agency Group, which represents the likes of Star Wars actor John Boyega.

Mr Rednall, 28, who still lives in Sudbury, said his time on The Quay Theatre stage and his experience in other professions were both vital to aiding his progression.

He encouraged others interested in acting to join the ‘am dram’ scene and build their skills, regardless of their age, background or experience levels.

“I think it’s a great way to start and test the waters,” Mr Rednall said.

Sudbury based actor Oliver Rednall has just starred in his first feature film


PICTURE: Mecha Morton

Sudbury based actor Oliver Rednall has just starred in his first feature film PICTURE: Mecha Morton

“I had a great time there and progressed from there.

“Just being in front of a paying audience is key. Really, it’s about staying open to things and getting any experience you can.

“I think it’s about working on yourself, and not necessarily the exposure it brings, because it won’t really bring any.

“I think going in front of your local public carries the same feeling as a London stage. It’s a case of progression.

“I learned a lot just from being in front of an audience, about timing, listening and being audible.”

Mr Rednall, who subsequently honed his skills at the Identity School of Drama, said opportunities are still there for those who did not have many chances to pursue acting while at school.

He suggested working in other fields beforehand had a lot of benefits and transferable skills.

“I’m working with a lot of people who started in their 30s,” he said.

“People often think you have to start at school, but, often, drama schools want people with more life experience. It’s very tough and physically demanding.

“I think acting has been the most physically and mentally draining thing I have done, but it’s also the most enjoyable.”

To find out more about Sudbury Dramatic Society, please go to www.sudburydramatic.com