Still thrashing sons at dominoes at 100

Muriel Daisy Bloomfield celebrates her 100th birthday, in Hazell Court Sudbury pictured with carers Kay Goodson and Pauline Murcott. ANL-150625-000346009
Muriel Daisy Bloomfield celebrates her 100th birthday, in Hazell Court Sudbury pictured with carers Kay Goodson and Pauline Murcott. ANL-150625-000346009

A family came together to celebrate the remarkable life of Muriel Bloomfield who celebrated her 100th birthday last week.

Muriel Bloomfield turned 100 on June 24, celebrating with family and staff at Hazell Court in Acton lane, Sudbury, where she is a resident.

Her incredible life story saw her go from “unloved” child to business owner, loving wife, caring mother and even back to a much-loved daughter.

Self-sufficient right through into her 90s, Mrs Bloomfield moved into the home in 2008 after her health deteriorated and she lost weight.

“At Hazell Court her health improved, she regained weight and strength and for several years enjoyed reading many of Catherine Cookson’s novels,” said her son Edward Bloomfield, 73.

“She now needs a great deal of care and support but still enjoys a sing-song when she can join in.”

Her particular favourites are the old classics; Pack Up Your Troubles, My Old Man’s a Dustman and her number one choice Danny Boy.

Mrs Bloomfield was born at Elderhouse Farm, Cockfield, the youngest of 11 children born to Christopher and Eliza Grimwood.

When she was only two her brother Ted was killed in action in France during the First World War.

Another brother John had been badly burnt as a toddler and his care took up much of his mother’s time, Muriel left to be cared for by her sister Lillian.

Edward, who was named after his uncle Ted said: “Life was tough and she spent the first few years wondering where she belonged.”

Growing up she helped out on her family’s farms, before meeting future husband Jack Bloomfield and getting married in 1938.

The couple set up their own farm, before her husband went off to war.

On his return they kept the farm before a move into the garage business in Silver End, Essex, at the same time bringing up two children - Edward and Richard.

As well as spending time with her family the mother-of-two enjoyed knitting and was known for her prize-winning jams and jellies.

Retiring in 1975 they moved back to Suffolk, buying a property in Sicklesmere.

After Jack died in 1994, Mrs Bloomfield moved to Bures to be near her son Richard before the move to Hazell Court.

There she spends much of her time listening to her music collection in her room, and enjoys little treats - her favourites being a slice of coffee cake or some fudge.

On the big day her two sons came down, joined by family and friends.

To celebrate the big birthday, she was given a cake made by the home’s chef and received her telegram from the Queen.

“She really revelled in having her family all around her,” said the home’s assistant manager Nicola Spinks.

Still able to thrash her sons as draughts and dominoes despite now needing a lot of care, Mrs Spinks added: “She got to 100 so she must be doing something right.”