‘Saint Edmund was crowned king in Sudbury’

Darren Clarke has uncovered new info about St Edmund which shows he was crowned East Anglian King in Sudbury.''Pictured: Darren Clarke, in front of the Olde Bull Hotel with a saxon flag and an old horn drinking vessel
Darren Clarke has uncovered new info about St Edmund which shows he was crowned East Anglian King in Sudbury.''Pictured: Darren Clarke, in front of the Olde Bull Hotel with a saxon flag and an old horn drinking vessel

A MEDIEVAL feast is set to commemorate a 9th century Saint’s new found link to Sudbury.

Saint Edmund the Martyr – the East Anglian King – was believed to have been crowned in Bures on Christmas Day in 855.

However, Darren Clarke, from Great Cornard, says that after extensive research, he has uncovered that St Edmund, who was allegedly captured and tortured by the Danish Great Heathen Army, was, in fact, proclaimed king in Sudbury.

“The ‘Royal Vill of Burva’ mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon chronicle was the original name for Sudbury and not the nearby smaller village,” said Mr Clarke, who lives in Kingsbury Walk.

“The confusion stemmed from Bures originally being called ‘Buesa’, while Sudbury didn’t get the south prefix to its name until the 9th century when other ‘Burghs’ and ‘Burys’, which is Saxon for fortified towns, appeared in the area.”

Mr Clarke, who works at Delphi, said it was likely St Edmund was crowned at St Gregory’s Church.

To mark his discovery, he has organised a Saxon feast night at The Olde Bull Hotel in Church Street on Saturday, November 19.

“I am really looking forward to it,” he said.

“Something needed to be done to commemorate this information and St Edmund.

“We will be having a traditional Saxon dinner with barley, root vegetables, meat and cakes for desert.”

Tickets for the feast are £15 and can be booked by contacting Mr Clarke on 07983 858338.