Hadleigh team completes raft race in memory of colleague for Brain Tumour Research

Colleagues from the QD store in Hadleigh completed a raft race for Brain Tumour Research in memory of their late friend Natalie Freeman. Pictured: Carol Denney, store manager Anita Page-Boulton, Paula Rastrick from Brain Tumour Research, and Neil Farthing.
Colleagues from the QD store in Hadleigh completed a raft race for Brain Tumour Research in memory of their late friend Natalie Freeman. Pictured: Carol Denney, store manager Anita Page-Boulton, Paula Rastrick from Brain Tumour Research, and Neil Farthing.

Members of staff at the QD store in Hadleigh who lost one of their colleagues to a brain tumour earlier this year teamed up for a raft race in support of Brain Tumour Research.

A four-strong team from the store in Aldham Mill Hill took to the waters wearing tutus as they rode in a man-made raft against 16 other teams in the annual Duck and Raft Race challenge on the River Brett.

They were inspired to take on the challenge after their friend and colleague Natalie Freeman died suddenly at the age of 25 on February 25, having only recently given birth to her second child.

Store manager Anita Page-Bolton, who was part of the raft race, said: ““We all miss Natalie every day, she was such a kind and friendly person and her family was everything to her.

“We wanted to do something fun to keep her memory alive and this seemed like the perfect fit. It’s a sad fact that brain tumours can affect anyone at any time but no-one knows what causes them.

“We hope our efforts will help raise awareness of this horrible disease and draw attention to the research that needs to be conducted to find a cure.”

Paula Rastrick, community fundraising manager for Brain Tumour Research in Suffolk, said: “For too long, brain tumours have been a neglected cancer.

“Stories like Natalie’s are so sad to hear, and remind us all we cannot allow this desperate situation to continue.

“We are extremely grateful to Anita and the QD team for raising vital funds to help us find a cure for this awful disease.”

To learn more, visit www.braintumourresearch.org .