Family pleads with drivers to slow down after pet cat is killed

Mark Westley Photography'Victoria Bayliss of Second Ave Sudbury, who's cat was killed by a speeding motorist, pictured with her other cat Pele and residents who would like to see the speed limit reduced. ANL-140924-140737001

Mark Westley Photography'Victoria Bayliss of Second Ave Sudbury, who's cat was killed by a speeding motorist, pictured with her other cat Pele and residents who would like to see the speed limit reduced. ANL-140924-140737001

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A devastated Sudbury woman has warned “it will be a child next” after her cat was killed by a motorist who failed to stop.

Victoria Bayliss has warned that streets around her home in Second Avenue are dangerous because of speeding vehicles, after her cat was run over.

The 40-year-old has spoken of the heartbreak of being told that her beloved pet had been hit, with the driver accelerating away when they realised what they had done.

“This is a residential area,” she said. “They will think it’s just a cat, but next time it could be a child.”

The incident happened on Wednesday evening as the family were waiting for a takeaway.

Seen by a neighbour, the cat was struck by a car, before being “thrown up into the air”.

The driver was then seen to have sped off, leaving the cat, Iliago, to drag itself to the side of the road with its front legs, as it was paralysed from the waist down.

Iliago, who the family had owned since he was a kitten, was taken to a vet and, at first, the diagnosis was hopeful – a broken pelvis and to be caged for six weeks.

Sadly, during the night, the cat suffered major internal bleeding and Miss Bayliss was asked to return the following morning, where she made the heartbreaking decision to have Iliago put to sleep.

Miss Bayliss said her children were now in “lock down” as she and her partner, Sacha Berriman, were worried that it will be a child that is killed next.

The mother-of-three has decided the estate is too dangerous to allow their eldest daughter, Amalie, 10, to take her siblings Freya, eight, and Jensen, four, to the nearby parks without parental supervision.

Miss Bayliss pleaded with drivers to be more mindful of where they are driving – and to slow down.

She said: “Are we really going to wait until a child is hit before something is done?”

Her calls come just a week after a similar appeal for speed restrictions in Friars Street. There is pressure from some town councillors for restricted limits in town centre and residential areas.

Miss Bayliss wants a speed restriction, speed bumps and a designated crossing area for the many children that go to the different parks on the estate.

“Speeding happens all the time here,” she said. “All the residents feel the same because we all have children.

“The council knows children cross that road – for them not to give safety facilities is wrong.”

Miss Bayliss said it was mainly young drivers that are guilty of driving too fast – and pleaded for sense to prevail.

She said: “It’s a short street – they save no time driving at that speed.”

Residents in the street have been asking for a 20mph limit in the streets off Springlands Way for some time.

However, Suffolk County Council policy states restrictions will only be granted if:

l Current mean speeds are at or below 24mph

l There is a depth of residential development and evidence of pedestrian and cyclist movements within the area

l There is a record of injury accidents within the area within the last five years.