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Primary school starts recovery to move out of special measures

ON THE UP: Headteacher Martin James, pictured with some pupils, is confident Tudor Primary School is making progress.

ON THE UP: Headteacher Martin James, pictured with some pupils, is confident Tudor Primary School is making progress.

A Sudbury primary school that was deemed inadequate by inspectors and placed in special measures says it has begun its road to recovery.

After failing its Ofsted inspection in November, Tudor Primary School headteacher Martin James said that the school had listened to the criticism and taken action to correct its problems.

The school was rated as inadequate – the lowest of the four categories – in the achievement of pupils, quality of teaching and in leadership and management.

It was deemed to require improvement in the other category, the behaviour and safety of pupils.

Inspectors suggested the school was put in special measures, meaning the school is placed under supervision, with regular reviews from Her Majesty’s Inspectors (HMI).

Since then, Mr James said the school had implemented numerous changes and improvements to see the school get back on track.

Criticism, in particular, was levelled at pupil’s progress in reading, writing and mathematics.

In their report, the inspectors said: “Not enough pupils make adequate progress because of weaknesses in teaching.

“Current school assessment data and work in pupils’ books show uneven progress across the school in reading, writing and mathematics.

“As a result of poor progress in the past, pupils in Year 6 are currently working at levels that are below those found nationally for their age in reading, writing and mathematics.”

Since the damning report, the school has changed its structure to get the most out of the pupils.

“We put things in place immediately and addressed the time table,” said Mr James. “Core lessons of literacy and numeracy are now in the mornings when students learn best.

“Students are being given the support they need, such as access to teachers for reading support.”

There was also criticism levelled at the marking and feedback given for pupils’ work.

Here, the school has implemented a specific time slot in the week for children to look back at their work and view feedback given to them by their tutors.

Teaching standards was another area which was deemed to require improvement by Ofsted.

Mr James said that the school had been working on projects, including co-operating with other schools in a bid to improve this.

The school has recently had a review by HMI, with Mr James confident the school had showed marked improvement.

“They were very pleased,” he said. “We know, however, we still have a long road to travel.”

HMI will continue to review the school, before calling in Ofsted again to carry out a fresh report within two years of November’s inspection.

 

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