‘Don’t ruin our town by throwing rubbish down’

St Gregory Primary School pupil Grace Hiskett, winner of the Litter campaign competition pictured with Sudbury mayor Jack Owen Picture Mark Westley ANL-150807-230505009

St Gregory Primary School pupil Grace Hiskett, winner of the Litter campaign competition pictured with Sudbury mayor Jack Owen Picture Mark Westley ANL-150807-230505009

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Five-year-old Grace Hiskett’s design was chosen as the winner for Sudbury and Great Cornard’s anti-litter campaign backed by the Free Press.

Grace’s design and slogan ‘Don’t ruin our town by throwing rubbish down’ was selected from more than 700 entries, chosen by customers at Tesco out of 10 finalists.

The reception pupil’s entry was shortlisted by a panel of judges, amongst them community warden Bradley Smith who started the campaign.

He said: “We love it. It’s very colourful, it brings a smile to my face every morning.”

Mr Smith sees the logo each day on his van, the design being turned into car stickers to remind everybody of the importance of a clean and tidy town.

The level of competition this year was extraordinarily high, with much debate between the judges when making the shortlist.

Winner Grace said: “I love drawing. It took me a long time. I am the little girl in the picture and I tried very hard.

“I think people should put their litter in the bin.”

As well as her poster becoming the new logo and slogan for the anti-litter campaign, Grace also received a winner’s certificate and a mystery prize from campaign sponsors Tesco.

Tesco also provided a goody bag for every entrant to go with certificates supplied by Sudbury Town Council.

Grace’s headteacher at St Gregory Primary School, Daniel Woodrow, was also successful, winning the first headteachers’ competition.

Mr Woodrow said he was pleased that nearly every pupil in the school had taken part.

“We are very proud of Grace who did a most beautiful design,” he said. “We are proud of Sudbury and we want to make sure it is a wonderful place to live in.”

Mr Woodrow added that the school was passionate about the issue, with it setting up its own eco-council.