Clare school pupils rise to Suffolk Free Press news challenge

Clare Community Primary School pupils have submitted their own news articles to the Suffolk Free Press as part of their Literacy learning. 


Pictured: Sadie Smith, Winner Rose Broomhall, Teacher Sam Bareham and Bell Rawlinson


PICTURE: Mecha Morton
Clare Community Primary School pupils have submitted their own news articles to the Suffolk Free Press as part of their Literacy learning. Pictured: Sadie Smith, Winner Rose Broomhall, Teacher Sam Bareham and Bell Rawlinson PICTURE: Mecha Morton
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Children at Clare Community Primary School have risen to the challenge this month, as they developed their news writing skills for a Suffolk Free Press competition.

Year 4 pupils at the school in Erbury Place spent four weeks getting to grips with the ins and outs of a newspaper article as part of their literacy learning, including how to develop snappy headlines, strong opening paragraphs and interesting quotes.

The news writing module culminated in a final news challenge based on the theme of two people’s adventures on a fishing trip, with about 30 pupils taking part.

The winning pupil, as chosen by the Free Press, was Rose Broomhall, with Sadie Smith and Bell Rawlinson selected as the runners-up.

Rose said: “You have the five Ws – who, what, where, when and why, the headline and the good opening and, once you have got those, you can put it all together. I liked making the quotes the most.”

She added that she was happy to be the winner, and looked forward to improving her writing as she gets older.

Sam Bareham, Year 4 trainee teacher at Clare Primary School, explained that the purpose of the module was to help the children develop their skills, from imitation to innovation and then invention, and he praised the youngsters for the progress they had made.

“They all engaged with it very well,” he said.

“We have got a vast range of abilities, but it’s clear to see the progression in all of their work.

“As a teacher, I can see some really great titles – there were some lovely puns and play on words.

“I think they feel that, once they have got that structure, they can be given a bit of freedom.”

Free Press deputy editor Duncan Bradley, who judged the competition, said: “I really enjoyed reading the stories. It was really hard picking a winner – the standard of entries was excellent. All the pupils should be congratulated on their efforts.”