Bury St Edmunds shooting victim named Red Lodge woman as behind the attack, court hears

Scene of shooting at Forum Court, Bury St Edmunds ANL-150508-101854009
Scene of shooting at Forum Court, Bury St Edmunds ANL-150508-101854009

The victim of an attempted killing named a woman from Red Lodge as one of the people behind the attack, a court has heard.

Jonathan Catchpole is said to have told a former Army medic who went to his aid: “It was my ex-girlfriend and her family.”

Rebecca Deferia, 30, of Carnation Way, Red Lodge, is on trial at Ipswich Crown Court having pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to commit murder between August 2014 and August 2015.

It is claimed she was part of a plot to have Mr Catchpole murdered after the acrimonious ending of their five year relationship.

Mr Catchpole, who is in his 30s, was shot in the chest at close range with a sawn-off shotgun after three men burst into his flat in Forum Court, Bury St Edmunds, on August 4, 2015.

In a statement, former soldier Alistair Kirk, who had been trained in first aid, told the court he heard a man calling for help.

He said he looked out and saw a man who said he had been shot and had blood coming from his body.

While receiving emergency treatment, Mr Catchpole said: “It was my ex-girlfriend and her family”, said Mr Kirk.

Earlier in the trial the court heard evidence from Mr Catchpole who said, moments before he was shot, one of his attackers shouted: “Rebecca wants you dead.”

Prosecutor Andrew Jackson told the jury Mr Catchpole, who had been left for dead, survived despite having 40 shotgun pellets and cartridge wadding removed from his chest.

The court heard this week from Dc Derek Riley who said that when an iPad, alleged to belong to Deferia, was examined, it showed a search had been made to obtain a floor plan of Mr Catchpole’s flat 17 days before the shooting.

Dc Riley said an image of the communal entrance to the flats at Forum Court was also found on the iPad which was seized by officers from Deferia’s parent’s home at Barking, near Needham Market.

Giving evidence, Mr Catchpole’s sister Sarah Spinks said she had felt ‘constantly watched’ after her brother moved into her home at Colchester following the breakdown of his relationship with Deferia.

Mrs Spinks said she also received a hand delivered letter written in red ink which said: “This is your last chance. You know what you’ve done. Shut your mouth or see what happens. That’s a promise.”

Police officers later visited Mrs Catchpole to say they had been keeping watch following anonymous calls to Crimestoppers alleging the house was being used for drug dealing but had realised that the claims were untrue.

It was alleged that false allegations of involvement with drugs had been made to deflect police attention away from the real reason for the shooting of Mr Catchpole.

Mr Jackson claimed Deferia had been ‘at the heart’ of the plot to have Mr Catchpole killed. He said it was ‘inconceivable’ the others involved in the conspiracy would have acted against her express wishes.

Following the ‘acrimonious’ end of his relationship with Deferia, Mr Catchpole was subjected to a string of hostile acts including tyre slashing, threats being made against his life and his clothes being slashed and dumped outside his workplace, said Mr Jackson.

Last year Deferia’s father Colin Deferia, 60, of Barking, Simon Webber, 32, of Somerset, and Frank Warren, 52, Paul Baker, 35, and Andrew Seaton, 40, all of Dorset, were convicted of conspiring to murder Mr Catchpole.

Ipswich-based private investigator Barry Parker, who was called to give evidence for the prosecution, said he had met with Rebecca and Colin Deferia at an address in Suffolk where he was asked to look into the background of Mr Catchpole and members of his family.

Mr Parker said he was asked to investigate possible drug related matters, finances, any convictions and to make contact with Mr Catchpole’s former partner and his previous employer.

The trial continues.